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Self Management of Osteoarthritis

Posted By: Richard Iorio, MD

Self-efficacy is considered a core component in self-management. Self-efficacy is a personal judgement of how well one can execute courses of action required to deal with chronic processes. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the association between self-efficacy and health-related outcomes in osteoarthritis.

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Knee Arthroscopy, Osteoarthritis and the Relationship with Total Knee Replacement

Posted By: Richard Iorio, MD

Arthroscopic surgery is a common treatment for knee osteoarthritis (OA), particularly for symptomatic meniscal tears with mechanical instability. Many patients with knee OA who have arthroscopies go on to have total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Several individual studies have investigated the interval between knee arthroscopy and TKA. Published literature on the risk of TKA following knee arthroscopy, the duration between arthroscopy and TKA, and risk factors for TKA following knee arthroscopy shows that TKA is more likely in knees that undergo arthroscopy.

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Physical Examination of the knee

Posted By: Richard Iorio, MD

The knee is a commonly injured area of the body. History and physical examination of this largely superficial structure allows injury diagnosis to be made relatively easily for most disorders. The indications for advanced imaging studies are not common and can be reserved for diagnostic dilemmas.

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Non-surgical management options for osteoarthritis are limited. Self directed exercise programs are the most effective.

Posted By: Richard Iorio, MD

Epidemiological research estimates that the lifetime risk of developing symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) is 45%1. Because of the shifting demographics with an increasing percentage of the US population older than 65 years, the burden of KOA will continue to increase2, 3. Although a recent randomized controlled trial demonstrated that total knee replacement is more effective than nonsurgical treatment of end-stage knee OA4, effective nonsurgical treatments are required to manage knee OA until surgical intervention becomes medically necessary.

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Internet Based Arthritis Self-Management Programs are Effective in Improving Health Status over the Long-Term

Posted By: Richard Iorio, MD

Arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the United State, and is a major reason for seeking medical care, and one of the most prevalent chronic conditions. In the past, evidence has been presented for the effectiveness of self-management in the treatment of arthritis-related pain and disability. The American College of Rheumatology has called for self-management education in its standard of care for osteoarthritis (OA). In addition, as part of its 2010 Goals for the Nation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention called for an increase in the percentage of people participating in arthritis self-management education.

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Platelet Rich Plasma in the Management of Osteoarthritis

Posted By: Thomas Einhorn, MD

Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous blood concentrate that has gained popularity among physicians and patients for the treatment of a variety of orthopedic conditions and injuries. The basis for its use involves the local delivery of growth factors, modulators of inflammation, and molecules that enhance the adhesion of cells.

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Weight Loss Can Decrease Progression of Osteoarthritis

Posted By: Richard Iorio, MD

Patients who are overweight or obese can decrease the degeneration rate and slow down the severity of osteoarthritis progression through weight loss. A study in RADIOLOGY showed that over a 4 year period progression of knee joint cartilage loss was decreased in overweight patients who achieved a loss of 5 percent or more in body mass index (BMI).

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Genetically Engineered Stem Cells to Fight Inflammation Caused by Arthritis

Posted By: Thomas Einhorn, MD

Investigators at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Shriners Hospital for Children in St. Louis, Duke University, and Cytex Therapeutics Inc. have developed a technology using so called SMART cells (Stem cells Modified for Autonomous Regenerative Therapy) that will develop into cartilage cells and at the same time produce a biologic anti-inflammatory drug, which will protect joints from the damage that results from chronic inflammation. Using a gene-editing tool known as CRISPR, the investigators remove a specific gene that is involved with inflammation and replace it with a gene that will release a biologic drug that fights inflammation.

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